Upfront Analytics has developed a suite of mobile games for the sole purpose of collecting market research via the system 1 method. Below are screenshots of each of our games, along with explanations. Scroll down to the bottom of the page for an in-depth breakdown of the structure and data that each game offers:


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 Name DropperSlice of LifeSpeed StampedeThe SalonThe VaultFuture Game: Odd RelationsFuture Game: Bluff & Bluster
Description of the use caseRespondent gives clues to another player to help him guess a specific name of a brand, product, etc. Each clue comes at a cost in game time.Respondent selects a preferred item from a set then predicts how the totality of players will prefer various items. The player who predicts most accurately wins his preferred item.Respondent chooses a phrase or adjective to best describe an image. Images can be photos, products, logos, drawings, etc.The Q&A room in The Pryz Manor: a “modular” survey where questions on different topics are posed each day. The store in The Pryz Manor: allows players to purchase specific items at a fixed price in the game’s currency.Respondent constructs photo challenges in response to a set of conditions, then races to complete those challenges. Involves retrieving and photographing brands and products in the home.Respondent estimates the value of something from 1-999. Other players then guess what the number refers to from a set of choices.
Input required for game setupTarget brand or product, competitive or benchmarking set of brands/products; list of attitude or associative attributes to use in the game.Set of physical items to be compared and awarded as prizes.Set of visual stimuli and set of phrases to be paired with stimuli.Open-ended or closed-ended questions; set of answer responses; visual stimuli; select one/select all.Item(s) to be offered for sale; price(s) to be tested; promotion(s) to be tested.List of items to be photographed by players. Items can be categories, brands or products. Items can also be modified (e.g., favorite food, most expensive shoes).List of statistics to be measured (e.g., prices, predictions, estimates).
Scope of input variables3-10 brands in a competitive set; 8-12 “framing” attributes (fact/category based); 16-24 associative attributes; one brand per category per player per day (e.g., not 3 shoe brands in a row).2-6 tangible items with descriptions.6-12 phrases or adjectives per player per image; one brand per category per player per day (e.g., not 3 auto insurers in a row).Up to 3 questions per player per day; questions can include imagery, audio, and video; routing and segmentation available.Up to 20 items per player can be tested at any point in time.2 brands per category per player per week (e.g., not 5 brands of shoes in one game).-
Variables delivered by game (including measurement level)Relative selection of associative or attitude attributes; order of attribute selection; speed-to-guess; guessing order within competitive set.Preference on an individual player level; estimates of popularity.Target player’s selected phrase or adjective in response to stimulus; time to make selection.Standard survey metrics.Actual purchase behavior per player to a given stimulus or set of stimuli.Photographs tagged and described by player.Player production of statistics. Player evaluation of whether statistics are appropriate.
Behavioral dimensions generated by gameAttitude; brand awareness; top of mind; perceptual map.True, behavioral preference since players are heavily incentivized to choose their true preference.Marketing awareness (e.g. taglines, commercials, spokespeople); brand/product knowledge; brand/product attitude; new product development.-Price-demand curve; relative demand between products; responsiveness to promotions.Actual ownership and consumption behavior. Pricing perception (e.g., a 2015 Buick Enclave costs $41,300); prediction/wisdom of the crowds (e.g., Hunger Games 3 will make $623M in domestic box office).
Other potential variables (also undeveloped) that can be computed with the game outputOpt-out behavior (skipping) indicates limited brand awareness/knowledge; pop-out effects; longitudinal tracking.Segmentation; ranking/conjoint analysis; voice of the consumer from a message board; longitudinal tracking; price perception (items compared with cash).Time for player to identify/match image with phrase or adjective (including against competitors); can test pop-out effects, perceptual speed/fluency; longitudinal tracking.Segmentation; ranking; longitudinal tracking.Longitudinal tracking.Segmentation; routing; longitudinal tracking.Segmentation; routing; longitudinal tracking

name-dropper

Name Dropper

How do customers describe your brand? Do they find your product luxurious or cheap? Trendy or retro? Can they recall your latest campaign? Is your product top of mind? Answer these questions and more with Name Dropper, a kinetic two-person guessing game.

Description of the use case

Respondent gives clues to another player to help him guess a specific name of a brand, product, etc. Each clue comes at a cost in game time.

Input required for game setup

Target brand or product, competitive or benchmarking set of brands/products; list of attitude or associative attributes to use in the game.

Scope of input variables

3-10 brands in a competitive set; 8-12 “framing” attributes (fact/category based); 16-24 associative attributes; one brand per category per player per day (e.g., not 3 shoe brands in a row).

Variables delivered by game (including measurement level)

Relative selection of associative or attitude attributes; order of attribute selection; speed-to-guess; guessing order within competitive set.

Behavioral dimensions generated by game

Attitude; brand awareness; top of mind; perceptual map.

Other potential variables (also undeveloped) that can be computed with the game output

Opt-out behavior (skipping) indicates limited brand awareness/knowledge; pop-out effects; longitudinal tracking.


slice-of-life

Slice of Life

Charitable giving, healthy living, receptivity to discounts: measure the intangible with Slice of Life, a game about true preference. Self-report techniques such as surveys struggle with social-desirability biases, but in Slice of Life players choose between real-world prizes, revealing their true preferences.

Description of the use case

Respondent selects a preferred item from a set then predicts how the totality of players will prefer various items. The player who predicts most accurately wins his preferred item.

Input required for game setup

Set of physical items to be compared and awarded as prizes.

Scope of input variables

2-6 tangible items with descriptions.

Variables delivered by game (including measurement level)

Preference on an individual player level; estimates of popularity.

Behavioral dimensions generated by game

True, behavioral preference since players are heavily incentivized to choose their true preference.

Other potential variables (also undeveloped) that can be computed with the game output

Segmentation; ranking/conjoint analysis; voice of the consumer from a message board; longitudinal tracking; price perception (items compared with cash).


speed-stampede

Speed Stampede

Humans are visual creatures and, with Speed Stampede, players express their gut reactions to all manner of visual stimuli. As players race to match images with descriptors, they give feedback on logos, product designs, celebrity spokespeople, packaging, movie posters and more.

Description of the use case

Respondent chooses a phrase or adjective to best describe an image. Images can be photos, products, logos, drawings, etc.

Input required for game setup

Set of visual stimuli and set of phrases to be paired with stimuli.

Scope of input variables

6-12 phrases or adjectives per player per image; one brand per category per player per day (e.g., not 3 auto insurers in a row).

Variables delivered by game (including measurement level)

Target player’s selected phrase or adjective in response to stimulus; time to make selection.

Behavioral dimensions generated by game

Marketing awareness (e.g. taglines, commercials, spokespeople); brand/product knowledge; brand/product attitude; new product development.

Other potential variables (also undeveloped) that can be computed with the game output

Time for player to identify/match image with phrase or adjective (including against competitors); can test pop-out effects, perceptual speed/fluency; longitudinal tracking.


salon

The Salon

Our games provide many ways to gather data about your brand or product. But what if you just want to ask a simple survey question? In the Salon, standard survey inquiries are interwoven with whimsical, controversial and entertaining discussion.

Description of the use case

The Q&A room in The Pryz Manor: a “modular” survey where questions on different topics are posed each day.

Input required for game setup

Open-ended or closed-ended questions; set of answer responses; visual stimuli; select one/select all.

Scope of input variables

Up to 3 questions per player per day; questions can include imagery, audio, and video; routing and segmentation available.

Variables delivered by game (including measurement level)

Standard survey metrics.

Behavioral dimensions generated by game

Other potential variables (also undeveloped) that can be computed with the game output

Segmentation; ranking; longitudinal tracking.


The Vault

Description of the use case

The store in The Pryz Manor: allows players to purchase specific items at a fixed price in the game’s currency.

Input required for game setup

Item(s) to be offered for sale; price(s) to be tested; promotion(s) to be tested.

Scope of input variables

Up to 20 items per player can be tested at any point in time.

Variables delivered by game (including measurement level)

Actual purchase behavior per player to a given stimulus or set of stimuli.

Behavioral dimensions generated by game

Price-demand curve; relative demand between products; responsiveness to promotions.

Other potential variables (also undeveloped) that can be computed with the game output

Longitudinal tracking.


Future Game: Old Relations

Description of the use case

Respondent constructs photo challenges in response to a set of conditions, then races to complete those challenges. Involves retrieving and photographing brands and products in the home.

Input required for game setup

List of items to be photographed by players. Items can be categories, brands or products. Items can also be modified (e.g., favorite food, most expensive shoes).

Scope of input variables

2 brands per category per player per week (e.g., not 5 brands of shoes in one game).

Variables delivered by game (including measurement level)

Photographs tagged and described by player.

Behavioral dimensions generated by game

Actual ownership and consumption behavior.

Other potential variables (also undeveloped) that can be computed with the game output

Segmentation; routing; longitudinal tracking.


Future Game: Bluff & Bluster

Description of the use case

Respondent estimates the value of something from 1-999. Other players then guess what the number refers to from a set of choices.

Input required for game setup

List of statistics to be measured (e.g., prices, predictions, estimates).

Scope of input variables

Variables delivered by game (including measurement level)

Player production of statistics. Player evaluation of whether statistics are appropriate.

Behavioral dimensions generated by game

Pricing perception (e.g., a 2015 Buick Enclave costs $41,300); prediction/wisdom of the crowds (e.g., Hunger Games 3 will make $623M in domestic box office).

Other potential variables (also undeveloped) that can be computed with the game output

Segmentation; routing; longitudinal tracking

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